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    Portraying improvement in the management of chronic pain: a multi-modal longitudinal interpretative phenomenological analysis study

    Nizza, Isabella and Smith, Jonathan A. and Kirkham, J. (2022) Portraying improvement in the management of chronic pain: a multi-modal longitudinal interpretative phenomenological analysis study. Frontiers in Pain Research 3 (901271), ISSN 2673-561X.

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    Abstract

    Chronic pain is a common, profoundly disabling and complex condition whose effects on identity may explain the distress experienced by those affected by it. This paper concerns a study exploring how the relationship with pain and sense of self evolved following participation in a pain management program (PMP). Participants were interviewed at three timepoints: before attending a PMP, 1 month after the PMP and 6 months after the PMP. To facilitate a deep experiential description of pain and its effects, interviews were guided by participant-generated drawings of pain and Self. Interviews and drawings were analyzed longitudinally using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The evolving experience of participants was outlined through different trajectory types. Here we describe the upward and positive trajectory of three female participants who were able to regain control over their lives. From a state of psychological stress where pain was represented as an aggressive and oppressive presence, participants' drawings, their narratives and indeed their lives, changed for the best. Pain stopped being the main feature, they were able to integrate it into their lives, make important changes and find a new balance. The results demonstrate the idiosyncratic nature of chronic pain and offer a nuanced account of its links to the lifeworld of those living with it.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Jonathan Smith
    Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2022 13:29
    Last Modified: 09 Jan 2023 18:04
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/49103

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