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    Experiences of cognitive training on primary breast cancer survivor's cognitive impairments at work: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Chapman, Bethany and Derakshan, N. and Grunfeld, Elizabeth (2023) Experiences of cognitive training on primary breast cancer survivor's cognitive impairments at work: a longitudinal qualitative study. British Journal of Health Psychology 28 (1), pp. 252-270. ISSN 1359-107X.

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    Abstract

    Objectives: Cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) is associated with adverse work-related outcomes in women living with a history of primary breast cancer. We explored the perceived impact of receiving adaptive cognitive training (dual n-back training) or active control training (dual 1-back training) on CRCI. Furthermore, we explored the perceived transfer effects of cognitive training on work-related self-management methods for cognitive impairment and work-related outcomes such as career development. Design: Longitudinal qualitative study. Methods: A 'framework' analysis approach was used to analyse semi-structured telephone interviews completed by women with a history of primary breast cancer before training (N = 40), one month (N = 30) and six months (N = 29) post-training. Results: Four main themes were identified: (1) impact of cognitive impairment at work, (2) perceived impact of cognitive training on impaired cognitive function, (3) perceived effects of training on work-related self-management methods for cognitive impairment and (4) perceived impact on women's career development and progression. Compared to baseline, women who received adaptive dual n-back training reported sustained improvement in multiple cognitive domains including memory and attention up to six months post-training when the follow-up interviews were conducted. Perceived improvements in cognitive function were associated with greater self-confidence and better emotional well-being in work. These improvements were found to lower dependency on self-management methods for cognitive impairment and enhance effectiveness as well as prompt career development or progression for many women. Although some findings of a similar nature were reported in the active control dual 1-back training group the perceived effects were more pronounced and consistent in the dual n-back group. Conclusions: Adaptive cognitive training (dual n-back training) improves perceived CRCI experienced by women in the workplace, enhancing their self-confidence and general emotional well-being. These perceived improvements, in turn, can decrease reliance on self-management methods for cognitive impairment and improve work efficiency and contribute to career development and progression.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Faculties and Schools > Faculty of Science > School of Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Beth Grunfeld
    Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2023 16:18
    Last Modified: 04 Dec 2023 21:07
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/52565

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