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    Haptic touch modulates size adaptation aftereffects on the hand

    Hidaka, S. and Tucciarelli, Raffaele and Yusuf, S. and Memmolo, F. and RAJAPAKSE, Sampath and Azañón, Elena and Longo, Matthew (2024) Haptic touch modulates size adaptation aftereffects on the hand. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance , ISSN 0096-1523. (In Press)

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    Abstract

    When we interact with objects using our hands, we derive their size through our skin. Prolonged exposure to an object leads to a perceptual size aftereffect: adapting to a larger/smaller object makes a subsequently perceived object to appear smaller/larger than its actual size. This phenomenon has been described as haptic as tactile sensations with kinesthetic feedback are involved. However, the exact role of different haptic components in generating this aftereffect remains largely underexplored. Here, we investigated how different aspects of haptic touch influence size perception. After adaptation to a large sphere with one hand and a small sphere with the other, participants touched two test spheres of equal or different sizes and judged which one felt larger. Similar haptic size adaption aftereffects were observed 1) when participants repeatedly grasped on and off the adapters, 2) when they simply continued to grasp the adapters without further hand movements, and 3) when the adapters were grasped without involving the fingers. All these conditions produced stronger aftereffects than a condition where the palms were simply resting on the adapter. Our findings suggest that the inclusion of grasp markedly increased the aftereffects, highlighting the pivotal role of haptic interactions in determining perceptual size adaptation.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Faculties and Schools > Faculty of Science > School of Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Matthew Longo
    Date Deposited: 17 May 2024 15:50
    Last Modified: 17 Jun 2024 00:10
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/53551

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