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    The association for moral and social hygiene: abolitionism and prostitution law in Britain (1915–1959)

    Laite, Julia (2008) The association for moral and social hygiene: abolitionism and prostitution law in Britain (1915–1959). Women’s History Review 17 (2), pp. 207-223. ISSN 0961-2025.

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    Abstract

    The Association for Moral and Social Hygiene was the most prominent and arguably the only abolitionist organization in Britain in the first half of the twentieth century. This article focuses on one of the AMSH’s most prominent campaigns, calling for the repeal of ‘the solicitation laws’: the series of statutes used by police the country over to control street prostitution. This campaign, at its height between 1916 and 1930, sheds light on the way in which British abolitionism, which had first developed amid debates over the state regulation of prostitution, came to form its policies and ideologies in the context of a ‘criminalized’ rather than a ‘regulated’ national system of prostitution control.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > History, Classics and Archaeology
    Research Centres and Institutes: Nineteenth-Century Studies, Centre for
    Depositing User: Sarah Hall
    Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2013 09:31
    Last Modified: 06 Dec 2016 10:29
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/8847

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